Tag Archives: mobile

Future of Email Hyperlocal

Why the Future of Email Marketing is Hyperlocal

Think about how many times you checked your email in the past twenty-four hours. How many times were you on your computer? How many times were you scrolling through your inbox on your phone?

If you’re like most people, you’re probably accessing the majority of your emails on mobile devices. In our most recent US Consumer Device Preference Report, we found that more than two-thirds of emails are now being opened on mobile devices.

While we’ve previously talked a lot about why it’s important to build responsive emails, it’s important to think beyond building an email that looks good on a small screen.

Mobile email marketing isn’t just about responsive technology; it’s about consumer behavior. Marketers know that they need to create more relevant messages and one of the best ways to start is to make emails that are hyperlocal.

As the mobile inbox becomes the predominant way that consumers experience email, marketers have to ensure that emails can react to changing locations. By geo-targeting your email campaigns, you can make them much more relevant – and help drive traffic to retail stores.

Defying the Digital Myth

It’s easy to think that the brick-and-mortar experience is dying off, but research shows this isn’t true. One recent survey found that 65% of consumers still want the traditional retail experience. And, to help with that, email marketers should test out campaigns that drive consumers to retail stores, instead of websites.

That’s why geo-targeting in email can have such a big impact on campaign results. An email for a sale at a shoe store is much more effective if there’s a dynamic map included that shows the location of the nearest store. The same goes for rewards/loyalty programs, reservations, and appointments.

Mobile is more of a state-of-being than a channel. If you’re sending out a major deal, someone who’s at the office and checks their phone should see a different map than someone who’s at home. That same email should show different locations once the subscriber goes to a new location or returns home.

By continually updating the email content in real-time, marketers can create hyperlocal sales that will see higher click-through rates and engagement, and ultimately higher retail sales.

The truth is that most consumers, when given the option, will still try to find a store and try out the items before buying. When marketers give them that option, customers will be more loyal to the brand and have a much more memorable experience that just pointing and clicking.

Want to learn more about how brands can use geo-targeting to drive in-store traffic? Download our case study to see how Allen Edmonds used geo-targeting and the amazing results they saw.

Geo-Targeting in Email Marketing: Why Maps Can Be So Powerful

Geo targeting in emails can help boost sales and engagement.

You’re out having lunch somewhere and you check your email. Your favorite shoe store has sent you an email with a one-day only offer. But going out and buying shoes wasn’t really on the agenda, so what do you do? If you’re like most people, you probably delete it just to keep your inbox under control.

But what if the email had a personalized map that showed you that a store was right around the corner? Geo-targeting for email marketing can personalize a customer’s experience and transform an email into a useful shopping companion.

We’ve discussed how Steve Madden used geo-targeted emails to personalize the customer experience. Using email to show the location of nearby store to customers can help increase foot traffic to retail locations.

Another benefit of geo-targeting is highlighting places where products or rewards points can be redeemed. Recently, AIMIA did just that and saw some significant results.

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The Apple Watch: Marketing’s Big Chance to Redefine Responsive Emails

Responsive emails are about user behavior, not just design.

When marketers think of “responsive emails,” we usually think of emails that are optimized for mobile. Basically, if you can easily click something from a smartphone and it looks good, then it’s responsive.

A lot of the time, that’s as far as responsive design efforts go. The reality, though, is that customers who check email on their smartphones are likely doing far different things than customers who are checking email on their home computers.

Responsive design according to mobile device is great, but responsive design according to mobile behavior is better.

That’s why the Apple Watch is our chance to redefine responsive email. Whatever the adoption rate for this watch, it shows that screens – and our relationship with them – is going to keep evolving. For mobile emails to stay relevant, they need to provide utility at every touchpoint, from laptop to television, from phone to watch.

And to redefine responsive emails, we need to first redefine email.

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Email Marketers Need to Pay Attention to the Apple Watch Announcement – Here’s Why

The Apple Watch could mean big changes for email marketers.As with every Apple event, the Apple Watch announcement is – deservedly or not – one of the most hyped tech conferences of the year. Smart watches have been done before. They haven’t performed too well, either. There are serious questions about whether the Apple Watch will be a success or a failure, if it will redefine wearable technology or turn into another Google Glass.

But, if it’s possible, let’s put aside that debate for a second and focus on something else: the impact that this kind of wearable technology is going to have on email marketing.

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The Terrible Truth About Mobile Shoppers

Mobile shopping statistics show a hidden secret.For the past few years, we’ve heard that it’s “the year of mobile.” Companies are frantically building mobile-first strategies and websites because so much traffic is coming from mobile devices. Our own research has previously found that more than two-thirds of email opens occur on mobile devices.

There’s no doubt that people are browsing websites from tablets and smartphones. Last year, comScore found that mobile visits (mostly from apps) account for 60% of total web traffic. Organic mobile traffic is lower, at about 30% of total web traffic as of last year.

But does that mean that desktops are getting replaced by mobile? In the world of eCommerce, it looks like mobile devices are shopping companions, but desktops remain the shopping destination. Black Friday 2014 is a great example – while IBM found that mobile traffic accounted for about 50% of online traffic on Black Friday, mobile sales accounted for only 27.9% of total online sales.

So, really, more than two-thirds of online sales occurred on desktops during Black Friday last year. That shouldn’t be a surprise – at the beginning of 2014, research showed that desktops were converting at about a 50% higher rate than mobile devices.

The reality is that the “year of mobile” is always going to mean the “year of multiple devices.” And that has big implications for email marketers.

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Are Email Opens on Smartphones Smart for Business?

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With more and more email opens taking place on mobile devices – but not necessarily purchases – many email marketers have been faced with a new uphill battle to prove the impact of their efforts on revenue. The question they keep getting from management goes something like this: “smartphones are smart, but are they smart for our email marketing business?”

Looking at aggregate data from leading retailers who are currently using Movable Ink’s Insight module within our new agileEMAIL platform, it’s clear that email marketing to mobile users is a critical driver of sales, even if the final sale occurs somewhere other than on smartphones themselves. Here are some of our preliminary findings:

  • A little over 60% of consumers who initially open their email on a smartphone end up purchasing through desktops, with another 25% purchasing through tablets. Only 15% of smartphone-first openers complete transactions on their smartphones.
  • Consumers who open email on a smartphone or tablet first, and then convert on a desktop, have a 14% higher average order value (AOV) than desktop-only purchasers.
  • iOS device users outspend Android device users by more than 20%. This is consistent with other studies we’ve seen tracking the differences in mobile shopping behaviors between iOS and Android users. With Movable Ink, you’ll now have the ability to unearth the precise AOV of your email subscribers based on the devices they are using.

We’re excited to see how these trends take shape across different verticals, different geo-locations, time of day, etc., and how the numbers will evolve over time.

Please let us know what you think about these early findings by posting a comment below. Are you surprised? What other data would you like to uncover?

Lastly, if you’d like to know more about Movable Ink’s agileEMAIL platform and our Insight module, request a demo and one of our product specialists will get back to you shortly.

New Research from Movable Ink Shows Surging Tablet Use by US Consumers

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More and more Americans are turning to tablets when it comes to interacting with consumer brands, according to a new research report from Movable Ink. The data reveals that 18.5% of marketing emails were opened on a tablet in the first quarter, up from 16.5% from the previous quarter, and from 13.8% when Movable Ink first started reporting on device usage statistics in Q2 2013.

The Movable Ink “US Consumer Device Preference Report: Q1 2014” also shows that there are only 13 states remaining where desktop email opens exceed smartphone opens. By comparison, the country was evenly split just nine months ago, when Movable Ink issued its Q2 2013 report, underscoring how rapidly the mobile takeover is occurring.

“Mobile adoption continues to grow, and tablets are playing a bigger role in the mix,” said Vivek Sharma, Co-Founder and Chief Executive Officer of Movable Ink. “Marketers should be laser focused on what we call “next tap optimization,” which is all about making it easy for consumers to engage with brands and shop when using their smartphones and tablets.”

The quarterly report provides deep insight into the popularity of various devices, examines differences in consumer engagement based on the devices they use, and shows how device preferences vary across the nation. Unlike other studies, this data set exclusively includes results from large, enterprise B2C marketers.

Key findings include:

  • Two-thirds of all email opens took place on mobile devices. 66 percent of emails were opened on either a smartphone or tablet device, up from 65% in Q4 2013 and 62% when Movable Ink issued its first report in Q2 2013. Desktop accounted for a new low of 34% of email opens, a decline from 35% in the previous quarter.
  • Tablets stole time-share from desktops – and from smartphones. This quarter’s study marks the first time that tablet didn’t just chip away at desktop time-share, but at smartphones as well (smartphones accounted for 47.2% of opens in Q1 2014, versus 48.2% in Q4 2013).
  • Apple asserted its dominance over Android. iPhones and iPads accounted for 54.5% of all opens in Q1, compared to 49.9% in Q4. Meanwhile, Android devices combined for 10.8% of opens, down from 14.4% in Q4.
  • Android and Apple traded places when it came to time spent viewing emails. Slightly more than 40% of Android smartphone users viewed emails for 15 seconds or longer, compared to 35% of iPhone users. In Q4, 38% of iPhone users lingered the longest on messages, compared to 35% of Android smartphone users.
  • Smartphone usage peaks in the early morning, tablets in the evening. New data revealed how device usage varies by time of day.

The full report is available as a free download here.

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About the Movable Ink “US Consumer Device Preference Report: Q1 2014”

Charts are based on data collected through Movable Ink’s agileEMAIL platform between January 1 – March 31, 2014. They reflect aggregate statistics across Movable Ink’s customer base, which includes more than 150 enterprise B2C marketers from the retail, travel, financial, media, and telecommunication industries. Because determining email opens requires images to load, the percentages for some devices might be over or underrepresented.

The Electoral College Map of Email Opens: Q1, 2014

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We’ve been hard at work poring over billions of data points to prepare our soon-to-be-released “US Consumer Device Preference Report: Q1 2014″, and wanted to share a sneak peak of one of the charts we’ll be sharing examining how device preferences vary by geography.

Our state-by-state analysis reveals the continued trend towards smartphone dominance. New additions to the smartphone state club in Q1 2014 included Colorado, New Mexico, Oregon, and Wyoming. Also, new in Q1, Mississippi overtook Texas as the nation’s top smartphone state, approaching 60% of all opens.

This map has gotten progressively pinker over the 4 quarters that we’ve been issuing the report, and now only 13 desktop states are left standing. For a bit of perspective, when we issued our first US Consumer Device Preference Report just 8 months ago (which looked at Q2 2013), 23 states were either heavy or leaning desktop, so the landscape is shifting towards mobile at an amazingly fast pace, and the “Electoral College of Email Opens” can now safely be described as a landslide for smartphones.

To download our past research reports, visit our Resource Center.

Methodology

The map is based on data collected through Movable Ink’s agileEMAIL platform between January 1 – March 31, 2014. It reflects aggregate statistics across Movable Ink’s customer base, which includes more than 150 enterprise B2C marketers from the retail, travel, financial, media, and telecommunication industries. Because determining email opens requires images to load, the percentages for some devices might be over or underrepresented.