Tag Archives: Lee Bankewitz

Infographic: Read Length, April 2013

Movable Ink Infographic - Read Length by Device April 2013

Chart is based on data collected by Movable Ink’s Advanced Analytics platform between April 1 – 30, 2013. The chart reflects aggregate statistics across Movable Ink’s customer base, which includes more than 100 enterprise B2C marketers from the retail, travel, financial, media, and telecommunications industries. Read length is ascertained through a Movable Ink tracking pixel embedded in the email.

Below is a collection of reactions to this infographic from the Movable Ink team. What do you think about the data? Add your comments below, or share reactions on Twitter by mentioning @movableink

“On mobile devices with smaller screens, it takes longer to read the entire content of an email. Read length might therefore be inversely correlated to device size, usability, and readability.” – Olivier Lauzon, Senior Engineer

“Folks on mobile devices are oftentimes multitasking—walking and reading, having a conversation while the inbox is open, etc. Maybe these users are getting distracted while their email messages are still open!” –Lee Bankewitz, Director of Engineering

“The mobile experience provides windows of time for immersion into content. Little moments, like waiting for a train or standing on line to pay for something, may provide those precious 15 seconds that allow us to spend more time reading through an email. This is likely one aspect of why we are seeing longer email read lengths on mobile phones.” – Jason Valdina, Vice President of Product

Click here to download the Read Length, April 2013 infographic as a PDF.

Movable Ink engineers featured in article on Amazon Web Services

Two of our engineers, Olivier Lauzon and Lee Bankewitz, were quoted earlier this week in a TechTarget article on their SearchCloudComputing site entitled “Startups omit in-house IT with Amazon Web Services.” Read on for the excerpt below, or view the full article here.

Startup companies, in particular, are focused on growth. Since those organizations are intent on expanding, they choose cloud computing for its ability to scale.

Movable Ink, a New York-based email provider startup, deployed AWS for its scalability and storage savings. Engineer Olivier Lauzon said the cloud helped the company decrease host provisioning times and costs, and it reduced the amount of restarts IT had to do. 

“The cost of storage on the hosts we were using was prohibitive,” he said. “Initially, it was mostly about savings, but once we were storing the data properly, we realized there was a whole ecosystem of AWS tools.”

Small businesses also are drawn to AWS because those companies are less likely than enterprises to afford in-house security tools and encryption capabilities. AWS bundles in encryption features for which startups would otherwise have to pay a hefty price. 

“Especially for startups, having a good encryption infrastructure is really key,” Lauzon said. “Enterprises are used to having that already.”

Plus, enterprises are more bureaucratic and have internal politics that dictate cloud decision-making, said Movable Ink engineer Lee Bankewitz. That could prevent those companies from adopting AWS, but there are plenty of reasons enterprises might need the cloud. They can deploy cloud services to separate groups within the organization if certain divisions want autonomy and less interaction with IT, he said. “Data processing is where enterprises will need AWS,” he added.